Your Moment of TrekZen*.

Because your off-brand landing party cosplay attempt isn’t complete without a little 2-way comm action.

Remco_Star_Trek_Astro-Wrist_Radios(Click to Biggie Size…if you dare.)

Ah, Remco. Gone, but not forgotten.

We are, of course, talking about that toy manufacturing king of the 1940s, 50s, and 60s. Particularly in that last decade before it closed its doors in 1971, Remco was (in)famous for toys tying into various popular television shows of that era such as the Adam West Batman, Lost In Space, The Munsters, and Star Trek. Many if not most of their toys bore little or even no resemblance to anything you might see on any of the actual shows, you understand, and often were actually the same toys across the different lines…just painted different colors and featuring show-specific decals. In this case, the Star Trek wrist radios might be yellow, whereas Batman and Robin sported their own semi-cool blue ones.

Among those items bearing the Star Trek label were the Astro-Helmet (with non-shattering lenses!) as well as my personal favorites, the Astro-Buzz-Ray Gun, and…of course, the notorious Space Fun helmet.

I mean, come on….

dayton-spockhelmet(I make this shit look good.)

Back in December, StarTrek.com convinced the awesomely good sport Ethan Peck to participate in an “unboxing video” in which he took an original Space Fun helmet out of its box (much to the horror of collectors across the known universe and perhaps other planes of existence) and actually placed it atop his own Spock-portraying head. I am forced to admit Mr. Peck looks far better in his helmet than I do in the one I borrowed from friend Nick Duguid for the above photo.

Much attention and discussion centers around the screen accuracy of any product – toy, replica, or whatever – tying into a film or television series, and that attention and discussion is multiplied times a bazillion when we’re talking about Star Trek. There are those among the fan contingent who want all knowledge of knock-off products such as these purged from all human memory. Then there are anarchists like me, who constantly lobby for some courageous would-be licensing partner to take up the mantle of producing sacrosanct reproductions of these off-kilter toys of yesteryear.

That’s right. Some days, I just want to watch the world burn.

Trek-Never Let Normal-Interfere-With-Awesome

(* = with acknowledgments–and apologies–to The Daily Show)

Your Moment of TrekZen* – Classic Thanksgiving edition!

We shall all sing songs of the Great Turkey Leg, on our way to the Stove O’ Kor.

Klingon Turkeys

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone. Here’s hoping you enjoy a restful holiday in the company of family and friends. For those unable to do so – servicemembers, first responders, doctors and nurses, and lots of other fine people answering a higher calling or simply having to work a job that precludes them from taking the day off – we thank you for your service and commitments and wish you a safe return home. And let’s not forget those who for whatever reason might be alone today, or who might need a helping hand.

(* = inspired by the “Your Moment of Zen” segments from The Daily Show)

Your Moment of TrekZen.*

The toys of my youth, when strict onscreen accuracy took a backseat to our imaginations on our way to hella fun.

Dinky-StarTrek-Space1999

That’s right, kids: back when I was 9 years old, these were the bomb. No, the “real” U.S.S. Enterprise didn’t shoot fat orange discs out the front of its saucer section, and neither did the Space: 1999 Eagle ever sport green as part of its color scheme. And let’s not even talk about the Enterprise‘s shuttlecraft.

I never managed to get my hands on the Enterprise (or the Klingon cruiser that was also available), but I do have distinct memories of breaking at least one Eagle.

Ah, the good old days.

(* = inspired by the “Your Moment of Zen” segments from The Daily Show)

Your Moment of TrekZen.*

Trek-Kirk-Picard-ArcadeFight

I have no idea where this originates. I did a Google image search and came up blanks. If anyone knows the creator and the story behind it, please let me know. As a kid of the late 1970s/early 80s and the arcade game craze of that era, I absolutely love this.

EDIT: As you can read down the comments, we now have a source for this image! An artist who goes by the moniker Ratigan is responsible for this little slice of Trek Awesomeness. Be sure to head over to his/her profile page on TeePublic.com and check out a whole host of slick designs.

And just so you know? Kirk’s going to totally kick Picard’s ass.

(* = inspired by the “Your Moment of Zen” segments from The Daily Show)

Your Moment of TrekZen*.

All the old paintings on the tombs
They do the Trek dance don’t you know
If they move too quick (oh whey oh)
They’re falling down like a domino
All the Metron men by the rocks
On that planet way out past the border
Big Gorn who smiles (oh whey oh)
He snaps his teeth on your tricorder
The captain with bamboo cannons say
Ay oh whey oh, ay oh whey oh
Walk like an Egyptian

#DontLetDaytonWrite Lyrics

This bit of amazing is the creation of artist Josh Lane. Be sure to check out his other work at his website.

(* = inspired by the “Your Moment of Zen” segments from The Daily Show)

Your Moment of TrekZen*.

Given the recent revelations about Spock on Star Trek: Discovery, this page from an old Star Trek coloring book might take on new meaning. It looks like periodic experiments with facial hair are something of a family thing, hmm?

Spock-ColoringBookPage

Now, I know what you’re thinking: “Come on, Dayton. This picture is just silly. It’s obvious it comes from one of those quickie coloring books done in the late 1960s or early 1970s, right? You know, the ones that look like they just repurposed art from the old Gold Key comics?”

StarTrek-AlienColoringBookWell, this is where it gets interesting. After doing some digging I found this page in a copy of The Star Trek Alien Coloring Book, which was one of (at least) four published in 1986 by Wanderer Books, at the time an imprint of Simon & Schuster. Each of which carries the “Star Trek 20 Years: 1966-1986″ logo. A couple of those books actually do use what looks to be recreations or repurposing of artwork from different Gold Key Star Trek comics from back in the day, but the other two feature what looks to be fairly new art. At least, I didn’t see it during a quick perusal of other such publications. Maybe they were anticipating Sybok three years later in Star Trek V: The Final Frontier?

“Wait,” I can hear someone saying. “How were you able to research Star Trek coloring books? Coloring books? Really?”

Look, people: I’m a professional, and professionals tend to amass a broad spectrum of research material. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it. Anyway, I think we can all agree that I’ve already spent too much time thinking about this. Just take the page and get to coloring, all right?

(* = inspired by the “Your Moment of Zen” segments from The Daily Show)

Your Moment of TrekZen*.

Today we celebrate the incredible prescience of Star Trek merchandising, which anticipated this very scenario nearly 35 years in advance. Remember this scene from the 2009 Star Trek film?

Or maybe it was by only 20 years or so, if we include the deleted scene from Star Trek Generations depicting Captain Kirk doing some orbital skydiving:

Now, if we could just get those groovy helmets officially on screen at some point….

(* = inspired by the “Your Moment of Zen” segments from The Daily Show)