Tuesday Trekkin’: “The Ages of Trek.”

Well, here I go…trying to resurrect yet another “irregularly recurring” blog feature that fell by the wayside while I was working on Other Things.

For those who’ve missed previous installments, “Tuesday Trekkin’” is pretty much just another excuse for me to babble about some aspect of Star Trek fandom. These evolutions often involve me yammering on about a fondly remembered bit of funky merchandise, anniversaries, “milestones,” or important dates in franchise history, convention memories, or whatever else tickles my fancy on any given day.

The “Tuesday Trekkin’” moniker is something of a salute to a pair of friends, Dan Davidson and Bill Smith aka “The Hosts of the TrekGeeks Podcast.” Over on Facebook, they have a fan group, Camp Khitomer, devoted to all things Trek where all are welcome to join in their positive vibes and community. They also like to push a #TrekTuesday hashtag over there, inviting members to share updates, links, and/or pictures celebrating their fandom, so this feature is definitely offered in that same spirit.

What’s up this time around? I can’t honestly call what follows “deep thinking,” but it is something to which I’ve given more than a few brain cells. In the beginning, it was an exercise in helping understand and bridge the gap that seems to grip different segments of Star Trek fandom from time to time. I’m old enough that I was born while the original series was still in production, but I didn’t actually watch the show until it was in reruns in the early 1970s. Despite this being my absolute favorite of the bunch, I consider myself a fan of the entire franchise. I may not love every incarnation or show or film on equal terms, but I can honestly say I’ve found something in each of them I enjoy and have no problem recommending to others.

Continue reading “Tuesday Trekkin’: “The Ages of Trek.””

Tuesday Trekkin’: Old-school Star Trek computer games!

Okay, so here we go again, attempting to get back to something resembling “irregularly recurring.”

For those new to these parts, “Tuesday Trekkin’” is essentially an excuse for me to yammer on a bit about some facet of Star Trek fandom. These exercises usually involve some fondly remembered bit of funky merchandise, anniversaries or other “milestones” of important dates in franchise history, convention memories, or whatever else tickles my fancy on any given day. The “Tuesday Trekkin’” moniker is a tip of the hat to a pair of friends, Dan Davidson and Bill Smith aka “The Hosts of the TrekGeeks Podcast.” Over on Facebook, they have a fan group, Camp Khitomer, devoted to all things Trek where all are welcome to join in their positive vibes and community. They also like to push a #TrekTuesday hashtag over there where they invite members to share updates, links, and/or pictures celebrating their fandom, so this feature is definitely offered in that same spirit.

So, what’s on the docket for today? It’s time to get our Star Trek game on, old-school style.

Continue reading “Tuesday Trekkin’: Old-school Star Trek computer games!”

Your Moment of TrekZen*.

Courtesy of friend Aaron Harvey, we have this bit of 1970s Star Trek merchandising goodness.

I have to admit – and this is something I get to say with decreasing frequency as the years go by – but I’d never even heard of this particular item let alone seen one before yesterday. It’s totally insane and yet has everything I love about that early era of Star Trek merch.

First, there’s the obvious “label slapping,” whereby the toy manufacturer just adds the name of a popular TV show, movie, comic book, or whatever onto something that evokes the tagged property in no meaningful way whatsoever. But then there’s the groovy box art that really makes this worthwhile. I admit I like it way more than the actual “Phaser Rocket Gun.” I’d actually rather collect just the box over the toy itself.

This gem was produced in the UK and likely never made it over here to the States in any signficant numbers, making it a definite rarity and item of curiosity for many a hardcore Star Trek collector. There was one other toy from “Lone Star” that I did know about: their “Inter-Space Communicator” which as you can plainly see bears absolutely no resemblance to anything you might’ve seen Kirk or Spock talking into on the original series.

“Can you hear me now?”

I didn’t do a particularly deep dive on this, and so only found these two examples of Star Trek merch from Lone Star, which I’ve decided had to be the British successor to our very own and very much beloved Remco from the late 1960s while the original show was still in production. You know what I’m talking about…..

For anyone interested along with any of you who keep insisting I’m hard to shop for, as I write this there’s currently an eBay auction for the “Phaser Rocket Gun,” with an opening bid of $350. So, so you know….bid early and often!

(* = with acknowledgments–and apologies–to The Daily Show)

Star Trek: Coda – interview round-up!

It’s been pretty quiet around here, lately. My only excuse is that I’ve been busy on the writing and consulting fronts, as well as the usual sorts of family and home things along with my volunteer stints at the museum. Between all of that and just trying to find small chunks of time to decompress if not outright relax, I haven’t devoted much in the way of effort to this space (so the thought of running something like a Patreon or Substack page where I’d ask people to throw money my way for new “content” and other online interaction seems pretty ludicrous, yeah?). I’d like to say things will be better in the new year, but let’s not get ahead of ourselves, all right?

For those of you tuning in to our program already in progress, you may or not be aware that over the past few months, the three books comprising the Star Trek: Coda trilogy were released. You may have heard about it, as word started spreading way back in February. Up to that point, I along with my literary co-conspirators, James Swallow and David Mack, had toiled in secrecy dating back to the summer of 2019. Over the next two years in on-again/off-again fashion, we developed a storyline to drive the books we each contributed to the effort.

I kicked things off with Book I: Moments Asunder, which hit shelves back on September 28th. Jim picked up the action a month later on October 26th with his Book II: The Ashes of Tomorrow, and on November 30th Dave brought it all home with the concluding Book III: Oblivion’s Gate.

It’s fair to say the books have generated a broad spectrum of reactions. There are reviews aplenty littering the lawless hellscape that is the internet, from personal posts on individual social media platforms to message boards and Facebook groups all the way to full-blown critiques from all manner of websites. Beyond simply thanking them for the time and effort they expended, I tend to refrain from engaging those who post such reviews be they postive, negative, apathetic, whatever. I never want folks thinking I’m lurking in the shadows, waiting to pounce should they somehow cross whatever imaginary line they feel I’ve drawn for such things. For one thing, it’s a dick move for an author to make, and there are plenty of examples of authors being justifiably roasted for going after readers who’ve posted something less than a glowing review of their latest pet project.

So yeah, we’re not doing that here.

In conjunction with each book’s publication, the three of us have all participated in various interviews. Most of these consist of one of us flying solo, as the thrust of said interview was our individual entry in the trilogy. However, the three of us have also had the opportunity to get together and discuss the entire project, its evolution, and so on. I’ve done my best to keep track of them as well as hunt for those one or two I missed, and collected links to them here. For those of you who’ve been holding off on listening to such interviews until you’ve had a chance to read the books or for some other reason you’re only now getting around to searching out such things, I’ve attempted to compile a one-stop shopping list.

First up? Me, talking about the trilogy in general and Moments Asunder in particular:
Trekcore.com (print interview)
Daily Star Trek News (print interview)
Beyond Trek Podcast
Go Trek Yourself Podcast
Literary Treks Podcast
Positively Trek Podcast
Trek Geeks Podcast
Mission Log Podcast

Next, we’ve got Jim with his take on our collaboration, highlighted by his own contribution, The Ashes of Tomorrow:
Trekcore.com (print interview)
Beyond Trek Podcast
Literary Treks Podcast
Positively Trek Podcast

Last but certainly not least, we’ve got Dave with his own thoughts on the joint effort, anchored by his senses-shattering* conclusion, Oblivion’s Gate:
Trekcore.com (print interview)
Beyond Trek Podcast
Literary Treks Podcast
Positively Trek Podcast
PaulSemel.com (print interview)
Traversing the Stars Podcast

And as if that’s not enough, we also have interviews with all three of us! Together! Noses pressed against our webcams as we stare out from our respective pillow forts into the webosphere:
Infinite Diversity Podcast

Is that all of them? I feel like there should be more. Either way, methinks that’s a lot of yakking.

Anyway, reading and listening to all of that should keep you busy. I want to say we have at least one or two more joint interviews coming up after the holidays, so stay tuned for updates. And as always, thanks so much for reading and supporting our wordy efforts.

* = Yeah, I read a lot of Marvel Comics when I was a kid. Deal with it.

My 2021 shameless holiday shopping suggestions guide.

It’s like this: I’m a freelance writer, which means I’m obligated at irregular yet all-too frequent intervals to throw myself on the mercy of a discerning populace and make my case for convincing you to part with some of your hard-earned spondoolicks in exchange for one or more of my collections of scribblings.

On the best of occasions, this takes the form of me standing behind a proud display of my works; tomes arrayed like little literary Stonehenges placed with Pythagorean precision while patrons browse the titles in search of something interesting. If the gods choose to smile upon me, I will trade many of these volumes for coin or notes, though there have been times when I departed the bazaar carrying the same burden with which I arrived.

Thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic which continued to hound us throughout 2021, all but one of my scheduled convention appearances were cancelled. As I did in 2020 when this mess started, I completely understand and support each of the con promoters and their decisions to act out of concern for public safety. Likewise, I sympathize with those same promoters along with the vendors and creators who exhibit at these shows, for they all lost huge chunks of revenue they obviously count on to earn a living. As for me, it’s entirely possible someone might well have bought a book from me at one of these shows, with the intention of presenting said book to a friend or relative as a gift. Birthday present? Perhaps, but this time of the year it might well be an offering for the looming holiday season.

With that in mind, I figure I’m not at all above pointing potential buyers to some of my titles that I think make fun gifts for that reader and/or Star Trek fan on your shopping list. For the most part I’m steering away from my novels and focusing instead on those books with a better chance of appealing to the casual fan as well as the hardcore Trekkie.

Yeah, I lied in that last paragraph. I’m actually starting with a novel, but with good reason: It’s the first book of a massive trilogy I undertook with friends and fellow word pushers James Swallow and David Mack. Star Trek: Coda marks a turning point in the massive, interwoven continuity of Star Trek novels published for the past 20 years. As of November 30th, all three books are available in trade paperback, eBook, and audiobook formats. Follow the links below for more info:

Book I: Moments Asunder
Book II: The Ashes of Tomorrow
Book III: Oblivion’s Gate

Elsewhere within the Trek realm, I’d be remiss if I didn’t offer up the closest thing I have to “evergreen titles” I think make fun gifts for the hardcore or even casual Trekkie on your shopping list.

First up? A pair of books to carry with you when you finally decide to blow off Vegas or Cancun and take a real vacation. Hop a transport to Vulcan or the Klingon homeworld, Qo’noS, and be sure to pack along a handy travel guide to your chosen destination. Hidden Universe Travel Guides – Star Trek: Vulcan will give you all the info you need to make your way around Earth’s oldest interstellar ally and one of the Federation’s founding members. Check out the planet that gave us Spock, Sarek, Tuvok, T’Pol, and Michael Burhnam. The book even comes packed with helpful hints in the event you find yourself taking part in a Vulcan marriage ceremony or even becoming the unwilling recipient of a dying Vulcan’s living spirit. This book wouldn’t be half as good as it turned out if not for the artistic stylings of Livio Ramondelli and Peter Markowski.

Vulcan too laid back or even Lebowski for your tastes? Kick your vacation up a notch with Hidden Universe Travel Guides – Star Trek: The Klingon Empire. In addition to giving you all the deets for visiting the homeworld, this guide also provides infobits about other planets within the Empire that are well worth a spot on your travel itinerary. Lots of tips from seasoned pros and welcoming locals, along with plenty of anecdotes from prominent Klingons as well insights into Klingon history and culture. Once again, my efforts are made all the better by the contributions of Livio and Peter, whose art graces nearly every page.

Looking for something to help someone get their craft on? A few ideas to appeal to that younger gift recipient who might like puzzles and models are the line of IncrediBuilds book-and-model sets.

There are dozens of options to choose from just by following that link, featuring kits tying into various entertainment properties as well as all manner of science-related topics. I’ve partnered with the IncrediBuilds team on five of these projects (so far?), including three Star Trek offerings: one each for the original U.S.S. Enterprise, the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-D from Star Trek: The Next Generation, and the Klingon Bird-of-Prey seen in several Star Trek feature films and television series. The models consist of a laser-cut wood sheet with pieces that don’t require glue or other adhesive, and are very easy to assemble. My contribution to each of these was a booklet of history and information about each vessel. Each was a fun way to write for a younger audience than I’m used to addressing.

Moving away from Star Trek, I also did two of these IncrediBuilds projects tying into theToy Story franchise, with models based on Buzz Lightyear and Sheriff Woody. As with the Star Trek sets, I provided a book for each model, this time telling different parts of the stories from the films as seen through each character’s eyes. Again, these presented an opportunity to write for a younger audience, which I thoroughly enjoyed.

My most recent collaboration with Insight Editions is also something I had a total blast writing: Star Trek: Kirk Fu. That’s right…we’re talking about the definitive guide to fighting like the one and only James Tiberius Kirk, famed captain of the Starship Enterprise, accomplished brawler of Klingons, Romulans, giant space lizards and imaginary Western black hat types. Artist Christian Cornia provides all of the art, including big, beautiful full-color splash pages along with step-by-step diagrams for each move. Be sure to stretch well before undertaking any of the moves illustrated in this handbook. Or, you could heed the warning and don’t try any of this at home because it’s all made up, yo.

Maybe somebody on your list likes role-playing games and Modiphius has you covered with Star Trek Adventures, fully-realized RPG set in the realm of the final frontier. I mean, sure…they DO have games based on a variety of premises, but right now we’re talking about Star Trek, all right? After helping game editor Jim Johnson and fellow writer Scott Pearson develop the game’s “Living Campaign” playtest storyline, I also managed to make some minor contributions to the game’s Core Rulebook. Next, last year I provided material that was included in 2020’s Klingon Empire Core Rulebook, which basically has everything you need to play Star Trek Adventures pretty much exclusively from the perspective of Klingon characters.

The most recent release is the Shackleton Expanse Campaign Guide, a massive book featuring a complete sandbox setting which greatly expands on information first created for the Living Campaign. I got to work with Jim and Scott as well as friends and writers Kelli Fitzpatrick and Derek Tyler Attico to develop a ton of all-new material to really flesh out what Scott and I started way back when. All sorts of other goodies are over there in the Modiphius shop, just waiting to help you make your STA experience a bold one.

The last couple of years have seen an uptick in my collaborative fiction output with by best friend and occasional writing partner, Kevin Dilmore. We had stories in two different anthologies last year and since then we’ve written three more such tales. with at least one more on the way.

For 2021, we were tapped by friend Robert Greenberger on behalf of Crazy 8 Press to contribute an all-new story to his anthology Thrilling Adventure Yarns 2021. A follow-up to 2019’s Thrilling Adventure Yarns, this is yet another volume crammed to overflowing with 1940s-style pulp action-adventure tales. We get to hang out with some of our favorite writers and friends, and it’s always a gas when we get to work with Bob and the Crazy 8 gang.

If all goes to plan, Kevin and I will have new stories in at least two new anthologies during the coming year, and as I write this we’re tossing ideas back and forth for a project that’s recently popped up on our radar and we’ve decided it’s too cool to pass up at least submitting pitches.

But since we’re here and I’m still digging on this particular tome, I’m going to remind you of this fun little project to which we contributed and which also came out last year. The pandemic ate into a lot of the marketing and promo this one was supposed to enjoy, so I’m boosting the signal again. It Came From the Multiplex: 80s Midnight Chillers, is an unabashed celebrations of 1980s horror movies, as well as Kevin’s and my first collaboration with the gang at Hex Publishers.

We had so much fun with this story that we decided the setting – the Vogue, an old-school single screen theater in the center of a small nondescript town in Anytown, USA – could more than lend itself to other tales told within those troubled walls. So, it’s entirely possible that may be something we do for goofs one of these days.

All right. I suppose that’s enough shameless promotion for one day. Obviously I’m hoping you’ll see fit to check out my various wares, and here’s hoping you find something either for yourself or that one particular name on your shopping list.

Happy 30th Anniversary, Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country!

“Captain’s log, stardate 9529.1: This is the final cruise of the Starship Enterprise under my command. This ship and her history will shortly become the care of another crew. To them and their posterity will we commit our future. They will continue the voyages we have begun and journey to all the undiscovered countries, boldly going where no man…where no one…has gone before.”

Far out in space, the U.S.S. Excelsior commanded by Captain Hikaru Sulu observes the destruction of the Klingon moon Praxis. This is followed by a request for aid from the Klingon Empire when it’s learned that the moon’s obliteration has contaminated the atmosphere of the Klingon home world, threatening all life on the planet within fifty years. Unable to combat the ecological disaster on their own, the Klingons have come, hat in hand in the form of Chancellor Gorkon, leader of the Klingon High Council, who proposes a peace between the Federation and the Empire.

Dispatched to escort Gorkon to Earth to meet with the Federation President, Captain Kirk and the Enterprise soon find themselves caught up in a conspiracy when the chancellor is murdered aboard his own ship. The Enterprise crew is implicated in the assassination, and Kirk and Dr. McCoy tried in a Klingon court and sentenced to imprisonment on a remote Klingon penal colony. Spock and the rest of the crew must now race against time to expose the conspiracy and prove Kirk and McCoy’s innocence, before assassins can strike once again at an upcoming peace summit.

And hilarity ensues.

Released on December 6th, 1991, Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country marked the final time the entire cast of the original Star Trek series would appear together on screen*. The film brought to a close one of the more remarkable resurrections and evolutions of an entertainment property, from cancelled 1960s television series to full-blown multi-media franchise. Its release concluded a year marked by celebration and mourning, highlighted by the observance of Star Trek‘s 25th anniversary as well as the death of original series creator Gene Roddenberry.

Developed by Leonard Nimoy and director Nicholas Meyer, the story was conceived as a way to bid farewell to Captain Kirk and his crew, clearing the decks for the eventual promotion of Star Trek: The Next Generation to the big screen. This proved to be accurate not just in real life but also within the fictional construct of the Star Trek mythos, as the film depicts the thawing of relations between the Federation and the Klingon Empire. This leads to an uneasy alliance between the two interstellar powers which eventually allows for the presence of a Klingon, Lieutenant Worf, on the bridge of the Galaxy-class U.S.S. Enterprise nearly eighty years after the events of this story. Indeed, that bit of progress was even foretold in “Errand of Mercy,” a first-season episode of the original series in 1967, in which the alien Organians predict that the Federation and Empire would one day work together as friends.

Pretty cool, huh?

In addition to making sure each of the main cast has at least one moment to shine at key points throughout the film, Star Trek VI also boasts an impressive guest cast including David Warner (Time After Time, Tron, Star Trek V: The Final Frontier), a pre-Sex and the City Kim Cattrall, a post-Robocop Kurtwood Smith, Brock Peters reprising his role of Admiral Cartwright from Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (and who would later portray Joseph Sisko, father to Benjamin Sisko on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine), and the late, great Christopher Plummer.

It also has what I still rank as my favorite teaser trailer of any Star Trek movie ever:

Though Star Trek VI marks the end of adventures with the original Enterprise crew, we would later see Scotty appear in “Relics,” a sixth-season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, and Sulu would appear in a third-season episode of Star Trek: Voyager, “Flashback.” And we can’t overlook “Trials and Tribble-ations,” where the cast of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine insert themselves into the events of the classic original series episode “The Trouble With Tribbles.” Archival footage of Leonard Nimoy as Spock also appears in 2020’s third-season Star Trek: Discovery episode “Unification III.” That episode is itself a sequel of sorts to two-part Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Unification,” broadcast in 1991 prior to Star Trek VI‘s release.

On the big screen, Scotty, Chekov, and Captain Kirk in particular would factor into the events of 1994’s Star Trek Generations, which would cement the passing of the baton to Jean-Luc Picard and his Next Generation crew. Fifteen years later, Leonard Nimoy would reprise his role of Spock and help to usher in a full-on reimagining of Kirk and the gang for 2009’s Star Trek reboot film. His final on-screen performance was as Spock in 2013’s Star Trek Into Darkness.

Still, Star Trek VI ends up being somewhat bittersweet. Though my fellow fans and I were happy to see our heroes in action once more, I also knew even as the end credits rolled and the theater lights came up that Star Trek–the Star Trek I grew up with, at any rate–was over. There would be more adventures in the Final Frontier, of course, but I couldn’t help feeling like I was saying goodbye to old friends for the final time. The last scene of the film, with Kirk reading his log entry as the Enterprise sails away before the cast “signs their names” across the screen and the music builds to a rousing rendition of the original Star Trek fanfare, is still something to watch.

It’s not a perfect movie, but it’s still a worthy sign-off for lifelong friends, celebrating the end of an era (of sorts) for those of us who love this stuff.

Happy 30th Anniversary, Star Trek VI.

* in addition to the DS9 episode, the other notable exception is a photograph of the cast inserted into a brief yet touching scene from Star Trek Beyond, released in 2016 to celebrate the franchise’s 50th anniversary.

Your Moment of TrekZen*.

Misadventures In Merchandizing, episode #3,962,175:

What’s wrong with this picture, amirite?

The above panel is from Passage to Moauv, a Star Trek tale written in 1975 for Power Records, which at the time was producing stories tying into various comic book characters and other entertainment properties. The stories were originally developed for vinyl records (latter cassette tapes) and this was one of three such tales originally issued on a larger 33-rpm LP record. The story itself has the disinction of being written by notable science fiction author and all-around media tie-in king Alan Dean Foster, who also wrote the accompanying stories, In Vito Veritas and The Crier In Emptiness.

Front and back covers for the original 12″ LP record sleeve.

Later in 1975, the story was re-issued on its own smaller 45-rpm record, this time accompanied by a comic-like adaptation of the script drawn by artist Russ Heath and inked/colored by Dick Giordano & Neal Adams (yes, you read those names right. THAT Dick Giordano and THAT Neal Adams), along with a cover by Adams. Of course, it’s with the comics companion that they got themselves intro trouble. I mean…..

Anyway…….

1970s Star Trek merch. Sometimes, you just have to roll with it.

(* = with acknowledgments–and apologies–to The Daily Show)

Catching up – Star Trek: Coda interviews!

Previously, on The Fog of Ward:

So, yeah. It’s been a minute since my last update. A confluence of events – work, volunteer stuff, kid stuff, other stuff – saw to it that the tree fort here was left neglected for a bit. That leaves me with a few housekeeping tasks to take care of. Namely, a whole bunch of interviews!

With the release of any new book, I’m asked for a varying number of interviews. These usually take the form of answering questions via email, or a phone interview transcribed for publication, and/or something done live via Zoom or recorded for later dispersal online. The release of Moments Asunder, the first book of the Star Trek: Coda trilogy on which I shared writing duties with friends and fellow word slingers James Swallow and David Mack, has attracted a greater degree of attention than I’m used to experiencing. It makes sense, of course, given the nature of this “Star Trek literary event.” As I, along with Jim and Dave, are grateful for this increased interest, we’re more than happy to “have a sit-down” with anyone who invites us into their space to talk Star Trek and our work.

So far, I’m pretty sure I’ve managed to avoid spoiling anything in any of the books, as a few of these were conducted before my book even came out. I’m obviously not looking to undercut anyone’s ability to enjoy the books due to my having given away anything, in particular for Books 2 and 3 as there’s still just so much coming after Book 1. Jim and Dave more than deserve their chance in the spotlight and to talk about the project without my having mucked things up beforehand. As I write this, the following interviews with me have been posted:

First, I talked via Zoom with Alex Perry from TrekCore.com and he somehow managed to translate my ramblings into something resembling coherence. That interview appears here, published the day before the book officially went on sale.

Timed to post the same day the book went live is an interview with David Powell and the Daily Star Trek News website. I carried out this one via email, which allowed me to consider more detailed answers than when I’m asked during a live Q&A. Read all about it here.

My first “live” interview was with the Beyond Trek podcast. Lots of fun questions and discussion, all while I tried (and sometimes failed) to ignore the football game unfolding on the TV in my office. You can watch/listen to that on YouTube, and be sure to check out their other episodes.

Friends Darrell Taylor and J.K. Woodward had me back for yet another episode of their Go Trek Yourself podcast. We talked about a lot of things, and somehow even managed to talk about Coda and Moments Asunder. Stick that in your ears here.

It’s been a while since I’ve talked with Matt Rushing, host of Trek.fm‘s Literary Treks podcast, and Coda gives us a reason to rectify that oversight. Check out our discussion here.

For a change of pace? I was interviewed back in August during Planet Comicon here in Kansas City. Multiverse Tonight podcast host Thomas Townley caught me at by exhibitor table and hit me with a special edition of his “5 Questions” challenge. Check it out here.

And hey! Some of the most interesting discussions about the book and the trilogy don’t involve me at all! For example, there’s this extended discussion about Moments Asunder with Chrissie De Clerck, Brandon Mutala, and Justin Oser on their Infinite Diversity podcast. Check it all out here.

As I write this, I have (at least) two more interviews about Coda coming over the next week or so, and I’ve had discussions about a couple of others. So, you know…keeping busy, but hopefully not so busy that I won’t forget to let folks know about them.

I probably just jinxed all of that, didn’t I?

Moments Asunder

Star Trek: Coda

STARFLEET’S FINEST
FACES A CHALLENGE UNLIKE ANY OTHER

TOMORROW IS DOOMED
Time is coming apart. Countless alternate and parallel realities are under attack, weakening and collapsing from relentless onslaught. If left unchecked, the universe faces an unstoppable descent toward entropy.

WANDERER, ORACLE, ALLY
Scarred and broken after decades spent tracking this escalating temporal disaster while battling the nameless enemy responsible for it, an old friend seeks assistance from Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew of the Starship Enterprise. The apocalypse may originate from their future, but might the cause lie in their past?

EVERYTHING THAT WILL BE
Identifying their adversary is but the first step toward defeating them, but early triumphs come with dreadful costs. What will the price be to achieve final victory, and how will that success be measured in futures as yet undefined?


At long last, we’re finally here.

I’ve already written at length about the journey to this book and the trilogy of which it’s just the first part, so I’m not going to rehash it here. What I will tell you is that it is my 23rd Star Trek novel and the 19th I’ve written under the editorial guidance of Margaret Clark and Ed Schlesinger, representing Simon & Schuster’s Gallery Books imprint. I’ve been working with either or both of these folks for more than fifteen years. They don’t get nearly enough of the credit and thanks they so richly deserve, and that is most certainly true with Moments Asunder and indeed the entire Star Trek: Coda trilogy.

This is also the seventh Star Trek novel of mine to receive an audiobook adaptation. As with the previous titles, this new book benefits from the vocal stylings of the wonderful Robert Petkoff. A self-professed Star Trek fan himself, Mr. Petkoff always brings enthusiasm and passion to these projects, and I simply love listening to him breathe life into my pithy little words.

Moments Asunder is now available at bookstores everywhere, in trade paperback, e-Book, and both digital and CD audiobook editions. If you’re still one of those folks who loves going to an actual store for your reading material, I humbly suggest patronizing your local independent bookseller. If that sort of thing isn’t feasible for whatever reason, then of course we have other options:

Simon & Schuster
Amazon.com
Barnes & Noble
Books-A-Million
IndieBound

Star Trek: Coda will continue on October 26th with Book II: The Ashes of Tomorrow by James Swallow, and conclude on October 30th with Book III: Oblivion’s Gate by David Mack.

In addition to providing a permanent home for links to find and order the book, this blog entry also will serve as the book’s “official” Q&A thread. Those of you who want to chat about the book, feel free to post your questions/etc. to the comments section. For those of you who’ve found this page and perhaps not yet read the book, BEWARE SPOILERS ARE POSSIBLE FROM THIS POINT FORWARD.

Before all the moments go asunder…..

So, here we are. The eve of the official release date for Moments Asunder, the first book in the Star Trek: Coda trilogy.

Along with its two companions – James Swallow’s The Ashes of Tomorrow and Oblivion’s Gate by David Mack – this is the culmination of more than two years of planning, plotting, scheming, writing, sweating, agonizing, doubting, cursing, and maybe even a bit of crying. It was a difficult path to navigate for a number of reasons, not the least of which was the sense of responsibility and obligation the three of us felt as we developed the story and then went to our corners to write our books, reconvening as necessary to discuss some plot point or weird idea one of us conjured late some evening. Then came the reading each of our respective manuscripts, poring over page after page to ensure consistency. I’m abolutely certain there’s something in there somewhere missed by at least one of us, but I promise you it wasn’t for lack of trying.

All of that’s done, now, with nothing for us along with our editors to do but wait.

Oh, and perhaps also offer links to where you can pre-order each of the books: Follow the links below for each book in trade paperback, e-Book, and audiobook editions:

Book I: Moments Asunder by moi
Book II: The Ashes of Tomorrow by James Swallow
Book III: Oblivion’s Gate by David Mack

Continue reading “Before all the moments go asunder…..”