I went and Trekked myself YET AGAIN.

Because it’s been a minute since the last time I babbled incoherently into a microphone and someone recorded it, I sat down a couple of weeks ago with Darrell Taylor and J.K. Woodward, hosts of the Go Trek Yourself podcast. I’ve been a guest on their show a couple of times already, and it’s always fun to catch up with Darrell and J.K. as our conversations bounce from topic to topic.

Such was this case this time. Things started off well enough, with the guys asking me about my “secret origin story” and how being a childhood Star Trek fan eventually put me on the path to being someone who gets to write Star Trek novels and other fun stuff for something resembling a living. We also spent some time talking about my most recent Star Trek novel, Agents of Influence (available at fine brick-n-mortar and online booksellers everywhere, you know), as well as a little bit of teasing about Star Trek: Coda, the trilogy on which I’m working with friends and fellow word pushers James Swallow and David Mack. Our discussion focused on how the project came about as an outgrowth of the “Star Trek novel continuity” that’s been a real thing for the last 15-20 years. Don’t worry, though! No spoilers lay within. Additionally, I’m a big fan of J.K.’s comic work including his numerous contributions to Star Trek via IDW Publishing, so of course we have to chat a little about that. It’s easy to get lost in these sorts of discussions when there’s a great shared affection for this thing from which we’ve derived such immense enjoyment and which has been responsible for so much of our individual successes.

And if that’s not enough? We even manage to talk about sports a little. Because of course we did.

So, if that sounds like something you’d want to stick in your ears for an hour or so, just go right ahead and click on the handy link I’ve provided:

Go Trek Yourself Episode 91: Dayton Ward and the Agents of Influence

Many thanks to Darrell and J.K. for having me on yet again to shoot the breeze and have some fun talking about our shared nerd love. I’m sure we’ll find a reason (excuse?) to do it again sometime down the road!

Margaret Wander Bonanno, 1950-2021.

Today I was shocked and saddened to learn about the passing of author Margaret Wander Bonanno. According to information shared by her family, she died unexpectedly of natural causes. There’s precious little information available at this time, but my thoughts now are for her family and friends.

Though she wrote more than a dozen other novels of fiction and science fiction, I came to know her back in the mid-1980s thanks to her first Star Trek novels, Dwellers In the Crucible and Strangers from the Sky. I greatly enjoyed the latter book when I read it soon after its initial publication, and to this day it remains one of my all-time favorite Star Trek tales. She was one of the great contributors to that era of Star Trek publishing and — though I didn’t know it at the time — an inspiration for me years before the silly notion of becoming a writer entered my head.

While she’s credited with writing five other Trek novels, she’d be the first to tell you one of them really isn’t hers. How one novel, Probe, came to be is a story only she can tell the way it deserves to be told, and you can find that account on her website’s bio page. As for the novel from which Probe is derived, Music of the Spheres, it is just what you’d expect it to be: a wondrous tale told by a master, that just happens to also be a Star Trek story. My copy of the original manuscript is one of the true prizes of my rather disturbingly large library.

She was a gifted writer with a wicked sense of humor, but also a kind soul, warm and welcoming when upstarts like me started showing up on the Star Trek fiction scene. I still remember the first time I met her at the Shore Leave convention, already established as a writer but still smiling like a fanboy as I handed over my copy of Strangers for her to sign. This happened soon after one of the true highlights of my Star Trek writing career, when Margaret joined Kevin Dilmore and I along with writers Mike W. Barr, Dave Galanter, Christopher L. Bennett, and Howard Weinstein along with editor Keith R. A. DeCandido for Mere Anarchy, the six-part eBook novella series published to coincide with Star Trek‘s 40th anniversary in 2006. From the beginning of that project’s development, it was a no-brainer that she would write the sixth, concluding piece of our little celebratory saga, and one has but to read her contribution to understand why she was perfect to anchor the series.

Back to Strangers from the Sky for one more bit of reminiscing: For those unfamiliar with the novel, it depicts humanity’s first encounter with Vulcans in the early 21st century, with Kirk and Spock traveling through time and keeping the fugitive Vulcans safe until they can secure transport away from Earth and back to their home planet. Part of the book involves events from a fictional novel Kirk is reading, also called Strangers from the Sky, and it becomes apparent that the supposedly fictional story is chronicling real events in which he and Spock somehow took part.

While Margaret’s story was later superseded by the 1996 film Star Trek: First Contact, which depicts the “canonical version” of the first visit by Vulcans to Earth in the mid-21st century, her novel has remained a fan favorite since its initial publication in 1987. Skip ahead to 2003, when I was working with Kevin on our first Star Trek novel collaboration, A Time to Sow. I was writing an early scene in that book when I made an impulsive decision to reference Strangers from the Sky. In this case, it was in the form of Will Riker giving Captain Picard a copy of the fictional novel Kirk was reading. As Riker and Picard were both involved in the film’s events and that version of first contact, it’s a bit of an in-joke on my part.

When I inserted the reference, I had no real idea I might do it again, but a few years later I was in the midst of writing another Star Trek: The Next Generation novel and found a way to drop in another nod to Margaret’s book. Then I did it a couple of more times as circumstances allowed, such as it becoming a book Picard read to his young son. A few months ago while writing Moments Asunder, my latest Trek novel which will be published later this year, I once again found a way to work in a reference. Even though I never call out the book by name in any of these instances, sharp-eyed readers still catch the “Easter egg,” which I once explained as a recurring tip of the hat to Margaret. Like I said earlier: Strangers remains a personal favorite.

At some point, she caught wind of what I was doing and wrote me a private note on Facebook, thanking me for acknowledging her in that way and how much it meant to her. As I told her at the time: “I know it sounds corny, but you and the others writing Trek novels back in those days inspired me to try my hand at writing. I have you all to thank for where I am now.

It’s true. Along with her contemporaries, Margaret Wander Bonanno helped to set the bar for Star Trek novels, elevating them to something more than simple “tie-in fiction” and establishing a standard I along with my colleagues strive to emulate. It’s an honor to be in her company, and she will truly be missed.

Thank you, Margaret. For everything.

Thrilling Adventure Yarns 2021: Now available in hardcover and trade paperback!

So, it’s like this: Back on March 16th, Thrilling Adventure Yarns 2021 was released by Crazy 8 Press in eBook format. As editor Bob Greenberger explained at the time, the eBook was obviously easier to format and make available as a download, helping him to start sending digital perks to those folks who supported the Kickstarter campaign to secure the funds required to publish the book. At the same time, preparations were being finalized to have the book made ready to offer in hardcover and trade paperback formats.

Well, they’re now available!

Thrilling Adventure Yarns 2021 is yet another celebration of those exciting pulp fiction stories of yesteryear, but with something of a modern twist. The book is jammed to overflowing with 27 stories told in classic pulp style, each one filled to overflowing to action, adventure, excitement, thrills, chills, mystery, romance, humor, and all sorts of juicy pulpy stuff.

Several of the writers from the original Thrilling Adventure Yarns return for the new volume, spinnning all-new tales with characters created for the first go-around. Others take on popular characters who now lurk and quest in the public domain, such as Sherlock Holmes himself! There are also new additions to roster, which explains Kevin Dilmore and myself teaming up for a new story, “Protocol 23,” which might very well be the first such yarn featuring characters we created. Plus, the cherry on top has to be a never-before-seen story by legendary pulp writer Lester Dent, the creator of Doc Savage. That alone has to be worth the price of admission, but buy your ticket and you still get 26 more stories as a bonus, amirite?

The roster for Thrilling Adventure Yarns 2021 includes: Michael A. Burstein, Russ Colchamiro, Greg Cox, Paige Daniels, Lester Dent, Mary Fan, Kelli Fitzpatrick, Michael Jan Friedman, Robert Greenberger, Glenn Hauman, Heather E. Hutsell, Paul Kupperberg, Karissa Laurel, William Leisner, Jonathan Maberry, David Mack, Ron Marz, Danielle Ackley McPhail, Stuart Moore, Will Murray, Jody Lynn Nye, Scott Pearson, Aaron Rosenberg, Dayton Ward & Kevin Dilmore, Richard C. White, and Sherri Cook Woosley.

The book also contains all-new art to go with each story, so readers be treated to the artistic stylings of June Brigman, Kerry Callen, Gary Carbon, Mike Collins, Daerick Gross, Matt Haley, Karl Kesel, Peter Krause, Luke McDonell, Ron Randall, Dan Schkade, Bart Sears, Daniele Sera, Jeff Weigel, and Mark Wheatley.

The book’s page at Amazon.com has been updated to reflect the availability of the hardcover and trade paperback editions along with the eBook version, so go and get your pulp on, whydontcha?

Thrilling Adventure Yarns 2021 is NOW LIVE!

That’s right, I said it.

Following up on 2019’s original Thrilling Adventure Yarns, editor Bob Greenberger and Crazy 8 Press are bringing forth yet another celebration of those exciting pulp fiction stories of yesteryear, but with something of a modern twist.

Thrilling Adventure Yarns 2021 comes at ya with 27 — count ’em: 27 — stories told in the classic pulp style, each one filled to overflowing to action, adventure, excitement, thrills, chills, mystery, romance, humor, and all sorts of juicy pulpy stuff.

Several of the writers from the original volume have returned, spinnning all-new tales with characters created for the first go-around. Others take on popular characters who now lurk and quest in the public domain, such as Sherlock Holmes himself! There are also new additions to roster, which explains Kevin Dilmore and myself teaming up for a new story which might very well be the first such yarn featuring characters we created. Plus, the cherry on top has to be a never-before-seen story by legendary pulp writer Lester Dent, the creator of Doc Savage. That alone has to be worth the price of admission, but buy your ticket and you still get 26 more stories as a bonus, amirite?

The roster for Thrilling Adventure Yarns 2021 includes: Michael A. Burstein, Russ Colchamiro, Greg Cox, Paige Daniels, Lester Dent, Mary Fan, Kelli Fitzpatrick, Michael Jan Friedman, Robert Greenberger, Glenn Hauman, Heather E. Hutsell, Paul Kupperberg, Karissa Laurel, William Leisner, Jonathan Maberry, David Mack, Ron Marz, Danielle Ackley McPhail, Stuart Moore, Will Murray, Jody Lynn Nye, Scott Pearson, Aaron Rosenberg, Dayton Ward & Kevin Dilmore, Richard C. White, and Sherri Cook Woosley.

Thanks to a wonderfully supported Kickstarter campaign, Editor Bob also was to commission all-new art to go with each story, so readers be treated to the artistic stylings of June Brigman, Kerry Callen, Gary Carbon, Mike Collins, Daerick Gross, Matt Haley, Karl Kesel, Peter Krause, Luke McDonell, Ron Randall, Dan Schkade, Bart Sears, Daniele Sera, Jeff Weigel, and Mark Wheatley.

A trade paperback edition as well as a fancy schmancy hardcover are in the works and should be available soon, but for now? Get your pulp on over at Amazon.com as the book is NOW AVAILABLE as digital format as an Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing exclusive! That’s right! Yesteryear is here as a cascade of free-flowing electrons right to your device du jour. Go check it out!

Engineers, Tholians, and the genesis of a Star Trek writer bromance.

I’m gonna need a minute to ponder the significance of the moment.

Not so much the moment itself, you understand. I mean, sure. It’s pretty impressive at least so far as it matters to the people who care about such things. For me, it’s not so much that it’s a moment unto itself. Instead, I prefer to ponder that it was the first of many such moments.

February 28th, 2001: Twenty years ago today, Interphase, Part One, the fourth installment of the still minty-fresh Star Trek: S.C.E. novella series, was published in what we now call “digital first format.’ Back then, we were just calling plain and simple “eBooks.” Call it what you want, but what’s really important to me is that this story marked the first professional fiction collaboration between and me and the dude who’s become my best friend in addition to my frequent writing partner, Kevin Dilmore.

How’d it happen? For that we have to set the Wayback Machine to just a bit farther into the past: late summer 2000. Back then, Microsoft was developing their version of an eBook reader, and they approached various publishers about providing exclusive content for this new platform. This included Pocket Books and John Ordover, who was one of the in-house editors overseeing Star Trek fiction. John and author/editor Keith R.A. DeCandido developed Star Trek: S.C.E. (“Starfleet Corps of Engineers”).

Taking place around the same time as the 24th century Star Trek TV series and associated novel lines from Pocket, S.C.E. features a team of specialists who get sent to deal with all sorts of odd tasks. Recover and study alien technology? Yep. Assist with any number of construction or repair projects wherever there’s a need for such hardcore engineer voodoo? Of course. Clean up the sorts of messes which might come when starship captains turn off world-running supercomputers and plunge an entire civilization into chaos before zooming off to their next mission? You know it.

(Just like you know who I’m talking about.)

While still working as a freelance writer for the Star Trek Communicator magazine, my bud Kevin interviewed John about various Star Trek fiction topics including S.C.E., which was set to be officially announced via the magazine. As they talked about the types of stories this new series might have, Kevin pitched an off-the-cuff idea that John liked. At that time, I was in the midst of finalizing In the Name of Honor, my first Star Trek novel for Pocket, but Kevin asked me to help him flesh out his original idea, and that became Interphase, a two-part entry for the S.C.E. series and our first fiction collaboration.

In Pocket launched S.C.E. in October of 2000 with the series’ first installment, Dean Wesley Smith’s The Belly of the Beast. Once things got up to speed, it published a new novella every month until November 2007. Over the course of the series, Kevin and I contributed ten of what ultimately became 74 stories. It was a fun project, owing in very large part to Keith’s editorial machinations but also the overall spirit of collaboration which was one of the series’ hallmarks. We all contributed a variety of bits and pieces to the series as we wrote our respective stories, and other writers would take those nuggets and run off in different directions.

One of the very odd quirks we learned about later was when the PalmPilot came along: there was a version one could buy in stores that featured four or five eBooks as added content, provided free with a purchase of the device. One of the offered titles was — yep — Interphase, Part One. As a consequence, Part Two was a “best seller” on the PalmPilot site for something like two years.

Go figure.

The series also proved to be something of a testbed for “auditioning” new writers without the pressure of an entire novel, and several of the writers who got their start with Star Trek fiction on S.C.E. later wrote full-length novels for the various series. Indeed, though I had written In the Name of Honor and it was published to mostly favorable reviews, I think it was our contributions to S.C.E. that played a much larger part in Kevin and I eventually being “called up” to the starting lineup for the novels.

While my first collaboration with Kevin was actually an article for the aforementioned Star Trek Communicator, it was this project that really got us going. In addition to the ten S.C.E. stories we wrote together, we also contributed two other novellas, eight novels, and a handful of short stories for the various Star Trek lines, along with a Star Trek comic story and a few dozen Trek-themed magazine articles. And of course we’ve done quite a bit of non-Star Trek stuff, as well.

Now, about that “bromance” thing.

“Chemistry is that one intangible that either exists in a situation or doesn’t, and has contributed to form some of the greatest partnerships of all-time, including Lennon/McCartney, Kirk/Spock, and Star Trek writing partners Kevin Dilmore and Dayton Ward. In fact, the duo is perhaps the greatest off-screen bromance seen in the franchise’s history.”

Rich Schepis, TrekMovie.com – December 2016

Well, there you go. Sounds pretty official and legit to me, amirite?

Obviously we’re still going strong. I mean, sure…there was that whole business where we broke up and then we got back together again, but these things happen. Though we’re not writing Star Trek together with the same frequency we did in years past, Kevin and I are still collaborating. We’re set to write a short story for an upcoming anthology project which hasn’t yet been announced, and we have a couple of ideas we threw around just yesterday that we’re both excited about. Stay tuned to see what happens.

Meanwhile…holy crap. Twenty years since Interphase? I’m going to go lie down, now.

Thrilling Adventure Yarns 2021: Now available for pre-order!

If you’ve been reading my monthly writing updates, you know that my frequent writing partner, Kevin Dilmore, and I got back into our collaborator groove a bit last year, with short stories appearing in not one but two anthologies along with an essay in collection dedicated to the 1960s Batman TV series’ first season. One other thing we worked on is now on final approach to publication, that being a story for the upcoming Thrilling Adventure Yarns 2021!

Like its predecessor from 2019, this latest collection of short stories draws inspiration from the tales that once filled pulp magazines from the 1930s to well into the 1960s. Stories of this sort run the gamut from Western to detective/noir to military, science fiction and everything in between. As with the first installment, this second anthology is coming at us via Crazy 8 Press and edited by our good friend, Bob Greenberger, who’s assembled a formidable roster of writers to give you a heapin’ helpin’ of pulpy writing goodness drawn (mostly) from those thrilling days of yesteryear:

Michael A. Burstein, Russ Colchamiro, Greg Cox, Paige Daniels, Lester Dent, Mary Fan, Kelli Fitzpatrick, Michael Jan Friedman, Robert Greenberger, Glenn Hauman, Heather E. Hutsell, Paul Kupperberg, Karissa Laurel, William Leisner, Jonathan Maberry, David Mack, Ron Marz, Danielle Ackley McPhail, Stuart Moore, Will Murray, Jody Lynn Nye, Scott Pearson, Aaron Rosenberg, Dayton Ward & Kevin Dilmore, Richard C. White, and Sheri Cook Woosley!

(Psst: You see “Lester Dent” in the line-up, right? As in “the guy who created Doc Savage?” Yeah. That Lester Dent. There’s a never-before-seen story by him right here in this book, yo.)

Have a look at the cover, whydontcha?

Click to Biggie Size.

Oh, and did I mention each story has its own swank illustration? Bob covered those bases, too, with the artistic stylings of June Brigman, Kerry Callen, Gary Carbon, Mike Collins, Daerick Gross, Matt Haley, Karl Kesel, Peter Krause, Luke McDonell, Ron Randall, Dan Schkade, Bart Sears, Daniele Sera, Jeff Weigel, and Mark Wheatley. Because you can’t have a pulp adventure anthology without some tasty pulp adventure art.

As I write this, a Kindle eBook edition is available for pre-order just by clicking on this bit of highlighted text right here. This edition is set to go live on March 16th, and a trade paperback as well as a hardcover edition is also coming. More info on that as it becomes available. Stay tuned!

It’s gonna get all kinds of pulpy up in here, people.

Star Trek books I wish I’d written.

Wow. New year. New me. New attitude. And yet, I keep forgetting I have this blog thing here, huh?

Nah, not really. It’s definitely more me than the machine.

I promise it’s not due to a lack of interest. It’s more that I’ve just been busy juggling various work things, and I’ve still got about a month to go before the craziness dials back to any significant degree. By the end of the day, I’m generally too fried to come up with something to write about here. When I do get an idea for a topic, I end up tabling it, then forgetting about it until it seems to lose its freshness. Rinse. Repeat.

Then there are times when a weird topic just sort of pops in, knocks crap off the table, and decides it wants attention. You know, like this one.

It began the other night, when I innocently answered a question posed by someone on Facebook: “Does anybody know what the best-selling Star Trek paperback novel of all time is?” They weren’t posing a trivia question. They really wanted to know.

Heck. Now I wanna know, too.

Continue reading “Star Trek books I wish I’d written.”

Goodbye, 2020…and good riddance.

So, 2020.

Damn. What a century.

A global pandemic. Lockdowns. Kids sent home to learn via “online instruction.” Political ineptitude and insanity, and that was just March, for fuck’s sake. If I have any takeaway from the madness that was (and still is) the COVID-19 situation, it’s that — much like professed political and other ideological leanings and the actions one is willing to take in support or defiance of same — it revealed to me glimpses if not full-on displays of the true character of a whole lotta people, for better or worse. However, after months and months of seemingly unending bad news coming from every conceivable direction, it appears we may well be turning a corner, even though many challenges remain (Did someone say, “New strain?”). I guess we’ll have to see what the new year brings on multiple fronts. Here’s hoping.

Continue reading “Goodbye, 2020…and good riddance.”

Aztlan: Investigator For The Empire – A Kickstarter project by Michael Jan Friedman.

My bud Michael Jan Friedman is making with more literary mischief.

Those of you who frequent this space have likely read something I’ve written about one of his various projects. He’s been around a bit, with a list of publishing credits that’s about as long as…well, it’s pretty long, and includes novels, short stories, comics, and TV. Yeah, he’s pretty salty as writing vets go.

Every so often, he sets into motion a somewhat crazy scheme because for him it’s time to bring to fruition a new writing project without the benefit of a traditional path to publication. In recent years, he’s relied on crowdfunding to help him acquire the money necessary to realize these projects. As is his wont, he sets modest fundraising goals in order to cover the expense of bringing the project to life, and in every case (I think we’re up to ten or so, by this point?), he’s hit his mark and delivered on everything promised.

Mike’s also one of the genuinely decent people in this whole writing business thing. He’s been a friend and supporter from the first time I met him — what, something like 17 years ago, now — at my first Shore Leave convention, and he’s on a very, very short list of people to whom I can never say “No,” when he asks for something like promoting his latest project.

This time, Mike’s returning to a character he created some years ago, Maxtla Colhua, a detective living and working in Aztlan, an Aztec empire which in this alternate version of history has survived into the 21st century. Maxtla has appeared in two standalone novellas, Aztlan: The Last Sun and Aztlan: The Courts of Heaven, as well as a third novella, Aztlan: Speaker of the Verse, which appeared in Mike’s anthology Cabal and Other Unlikely Invocations of the Muse.

Maxtla is set to return in Aztlan: Investigator for the Empire, but it can’t happen without the help of folks like you who are currently reading this. What’s it all about? As has become the norm for these things, I’ve learned to just let Mike tell you:


Aztlan: The Maxtla Colhua Mysteries came out in 2012 (though it feels like it was yesterday), coinciding with the supposed end of the Mesoamerican cosmos. It was comprised of two novellas, Aztlan: The Last Sun and Aztlan: The Courts of Heaven

Since then, I’ve written another half-dozen books under the aegis of Crazy 8 and edited a few more. But I always felt the tug of Maxtla Colhua, hard-nosed Investigator for the Empire–a fiery athlete who followed his father’s path and became a detective after he blew out his knee in the ball court.

“When are you going to write another Maxtla book?” fans and friends would ask me at conventions. One really wonderful couple even named their dog Maxtla. “Soon,” I said. And the years flew by.

And Maxtla’s tug on me grew more and more insistent all the time. More urgent. More determined not to be denied. Who was I to say no to such perseverance?

So here we are. Answering the call. You and me. Because it’s between the reader and the writer that the magic takes place, and what do we need more these days than a little magic?

Aztlan: Investigator For The Empire…it may not find a place in the bookstore, but I’m hoping there’s a place for it on your shelf…and in your heart.


Sounds cool, amirite?

As is always the case with his Kickstarters, Mike is offering a number of rewards and even a few surprises for those who choose to back the project. For the complete rundown on Aztlan: Investigator For The Empire and everything Mike’s putting out there for your consideration, hop on over to Kickstarter and check out the project’s page:

Aztlan: Investigator for the Empire
by Michael Jan Friedman

As I write this, the Kickstarter is sitting at $2,535 of its rather unpretentious $3,500 funding goal, with ten days to go. Anyone who’s participated in a Kickstarter campaign knows it’s an all-or-nothing proposition, and it’d be a shame for Mike to lose the ball this close to the goal line. So, if you wouldn’t mind giving this new project a look and you’re willing and able to do so, I hope you’ll consider supporting it.

Good luck, Mike!

Thrilling Adventure Yarns 2021: A new anthology that needs you!

It seems my friend Bob Greenberger has been busy.

In addition to being a veteran comics and prose writer and editor and one of the genuinely nice guys in the business, Bob is also one of the octet of brains comprising Crazy 8 Press. Among the various projects with which he’s been involved with that scrappy little publisher that could is Thrilling Adventure Yarns.

In 2018, Bob launched a Kickstarter campaign to crowdfund the money necessary to bring together an pretty snazzy collection of pulp-inspired action-adventure tales. For that first campaign, he set a very modest goal of $4,500 to cover the expenses of producing the anthology to include paying the writers, the cover artist, printing the books and prepping the eBook versions, and delivering on the various backer rewards. The campaign ended up receiving more than $11,000, allowing Bob to activate a number of stretch/bonus goals and unlock even more rewards for those who donated to the cause, and the anthology was published in the summer of 2019, premiering at that year’s annual Shore Leave convention. The result was a pretty sharp looking tome of which I confess I was a tad envious.

Skip ahead to October 2020, and Bob’s doing it all over again!

That’s right! Mr. G has assembled a cast of returning and new-contributors for a second collection of exciting stories which pay homage in various and sundry ways to the pulpy fiction of Yesteryear. I’m told this new crop of tales run the gamut, from period pieces to stories set in the modern day. A few authors from the first volume are bringing back characters they showcased last time, and Bob promises a few surprises if the planets align in just the right fashion.

However, he–and, indeed, all of us who are a part of this anthology–need your help to get those planets aligned just so. Far be it from me to steal any of Bob’s thunder or any of the words he put together to tout this new effort. Instead, allow me to direct you to the Kickstarter for Thrilling Adventure Yarns 2021 and let you see for yourself what all the fuss is about:

Another edition of Thrilling Adventure Yarns, a celebration of the pulp magazines!

For those of you new to this sort of fundraising campaign, this is an “all or nothing” deal: if the project fails to hit its initial $6,000 goal, then any money pledged during the campaign period will be forfeited and those who backed the project won’t be charged a thin dime. Any monies received in excess of that mark will go toward realizing the appropriate stretch goals, about which you can read more than you really want to know at the above link. Kevin and I collaborated on an all-new story for this installment, joining this roster of friends and fellow word-pushers:

Aaron Rosenberg, Michael Jan Friedman, Glenn Hauman, Mary Fan, Paul Kupperberg, Russ Colchamiro, David Mack, Paige Daniels, Will Murray, Karissa Laurel, William Leisner, Danielle Ackley McPhail, Greg Cox, Heather E. Hutsell, Kelli Fitzpatrick, Michael A. Burstein, Richard White, Scott Pearson, and Sherri Cook Woosley.

For our story, Kevin and I created a setup and characters I really hope we get to revisit someday, either in a future edition of Thrilling Adventure Yarns or via some other means. However, that’s way down the road. First, we need to get this project funded so we can roll out this volume!

The campaign went live tonight, October 15th, and goes until 9pm Eastern Time on November 14th. The clock’s ticking, all Jack Bauer/24-style even as I type this. So, if you want to get in on the ground floor of a kick-ass new anthology of awesome pulpy short stories, here’s your chance. Go give it a look-see, whydontcha?

Thrilling Adventure Yarns 2021!